The Aussie-English dictionary: Australian lingo definitions

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When you’re driving around on your Australian road trip holiday, you’ll probably notice the lingo is a little … not what you’re used to. Indeed, since Australia was first colonised by Europeans in the late 1700s, somewhere along the line the English language took a turn to give local Aussies a language of their very own.

To help prepare you for the road ahead, here is a quick Australian-English dictionary.

50 k’s south of Woop Woop

The term ‘Woop Woop’ refers to a small town you don’t really need to know the name of. If you are ’50 k’s (kilometres) south of Woop Woop’, it means you are in the middle of nowhere.

Ace

Good/excellent (and our favourite on this list)!

Ankle biter

Children.

Arvo

Afternoon.

Away with the pixies

Dreaming, day dreaming or dazed in some fashion.

Barbie

Not a famous doll, but actually a barbecue.

Beauty/beaut

More or less the same as ‘ace’.

Bloke

A male.

Bloody

Used to intensify a statement. Similar to ‘very’. For instance, “You bloody drongo (see below).”

Bonzer

Also the same as ‘ace’.

Budgy smuggler

Speedos swimming trunks.

Bush

Areas of flora (not necessarily just bushes).

Chocka

Full. You may also hear ‘chock-full’.

Chunder

Puke/vomit – ‘chunder’ like the men Down Under! Also known as a ‘liquid laugh’.

Crikey

Used when a person is surprised or needs to exclaim. For instance, “Crikey​, this scenery is beautiful!”

Defo

Definitely.

Docket

Your shopping receipt.

Drongo

A dim-witted or dull individual.

Dunny

An outdoor toilet (such as a long drop).

Fair dinkum

Trustworthy, fair and/or honest.

Flat out

Going very fast. Generally as fast as possible.

Footy

Aussie rules football – not soccer.

G’day

A greeting. Short for good day.

Go off like a frog in a sock

Get very angry.

Grog

An alcoholic beverage, typically beer.

Hard yacka

Hard work.

Heaps

Lots. A large amount.

Joey

A young kangaroo

Kangaroos loose in the top paddock

Unintelligent. “He’s got a few kangaroos loose in the top paddock.”

Knackered

Tired, generally very tired.

London to a brick

Very certain.

Maccas

McDonald’s restaurant.

Mate

Friend. Even if it’s a stranger.

Mozzie

Mosquito. Often combined with ‘bloody’, e.g. “Bloody mozzies!”

No worries/drama

If something is OK, achievable or otherwise acceptable, you would say “No worries” or “No drama”, possibly finished with ‘mate’.

Ocker

A rude/unsophisticated/rough person with poor social skills.

On the piss

Consuming alcohol/having a drinks night.

Poo ticket

Toilet paper.

Rattlesnake in a lucky dip

Used in conjunction with ‘as welcome as a’, ‘as popular as a’ or similar. Emphasises that the subject was not welcome/popular.

Reckon

To think or figure. E.g., “I reckon you take a left just up ahead.”

Rego

Vehicle registration.

Sanga

Sandwich.

Shark biscuit

An inexperienced surfer.

Sheila

A female.

She’ll be right

Similar to ‘no worries’. Generally used to say something will be alright. For example, if you run out of petrol but an Aussie is there to save the day, he or she might say, “She’ll be right, mate. I can help ya, no worries.”

Stoked

Excited, happy or positive in some way.

Thong

Definitely not slim underwear. Here in Oz, ‘thong’ means ‘flip flops’.

Tinny

A can of beer (also known as a stubbie) or small, tin boat.

Togs

Swimwear.

Ute

Pick-up truck/utility vehicle.

Vico

The state of Victoria.

Wobbly

Overly excited. If you “throw a wobbly”, you are reacting a little over the top.

Yewy

A U-turn.

Yobbo

An aggressive or uncouth person. A ‘yobbo’ tends to more frequently be a young person.

Yonks

A long time/ages.